AYSO Region 1258   AYSO Region 1258
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Referees' Corner
Welcome to the Region 1258 Referees' Corner. The purpose of the Referees' Corner is to provide insight to the many volunteer referees, coaches and parents who have accepted the responsibility of teaching our children the game of soccer through proper application and enforcement of the Laws of the game. The Referees' Corner should be used as a reference point for any and all issues associated with refereeing and the Laws of the game. Please submit any and all inquiries to our Region Referee Administrator through the box below and check back often for updates.
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Referees' Questions Answered
Referee Points
Region 1258 cannot offer safe, fun and fair games for our players without volunteer referees. In order for Region 1258 to succeed in supporting such a large pool of players, it must recruit, train, develop and retain a pool of competent volunteer referees and officials. Paying referees is not an option because AYSO is a non-profit, volunteer organization.

To incentivize the participation of volunteer referees, the Region has implemented a point system that will qualify teams to participate in the Regional Playoffs based on each teams’ contribution to the referee pool. Specifically, each team in the U10-19 divisions is required to earn a minimum of 7 points during the regular spring season and commit to assist or referee at least one game in the playoffs to qualify their team to play in Regional Playoffs at the end of the regular season.

Points may be earned during the regular season as follows:
  • 2 Points - Referee U14-19 game
  • 1.5 Points - Assistant Referee U14-19 game OR Referee U10-12 game
  • 1 Point - Assistant Referee U10-12 game OR Referee U8 game
  • A referee can split his/her points between a maximum of two teams and excees points cannot be shared or otherwise donated
Referee training is provided by Region 1258 at the times and locations identified on the website.

Although we encourage your participation, please remember that volunteering to referee is NOT a right, it comes with the responsibility to act with integrity, honest effort and the promise to never criticize the calls of our fellow referee's. We need volunteers to train and develop into Intermediate and Advanced Referees who will, one day, become Instructors and Assessors in support of the Region for years to come.
When and where are the Regional Referee Trainings?
Regional Referee training is mandatory for all center referees. Training assists referees in making practical application of the principles learned online or in the classroom. Below are the steps necessary to volunteer as a referee:
  • Register as a volunteer. Step-by-step instructions on how to register as a volunteer and print out your completed Volunteer Application can be found by clicking HERE.

  • Take the Basic Referee, Safe Haven and Concussion Awareness classes by clicking HERE

  • Take a class on the following dates:



REGIONAL REFEREE TRAINING
SessionDescriptionDateTimeLocation
1ClassSat., Aug. 20, 20169:00a-1:00pTrails Community Center
2ClassTues., Aug. 23, 20165:30p-9:00pWillows Community Center
3 (Youth Training)ClassSat., Aug. 27, 20169:00a-1:00pWillows Community Center
4 (Youth Training)ClassWed., Sept. 14, 20165:30p-9:00pKeller Williams Ste. 100


Please bring the following items to the training session: (1) your Driver's License No. and (2) a completed Volunteer Application.

For more information regarding prerequisites, please click HERE. Should you have any questions regarding the training schedule, please contact our Region Referee Administrator at refereeadmin@lvsoccer.org.
When and where are the Assistant Referee Trainings?
Assistant Referee training is mandatory for all assistant referees. Training assists assistant referees in making practical application of the principles learned online or in the classroom. Region 1258 is hosting the following training sessions for Assistant Referees:







ASSISTANT REFEREE TRAINING
SessionDescriptionDateTimeLocation
1ClassTBDTBDTBD
2ClassTBDTBDTBD


Please bring the following items to the training session: (1) your Driver's License No. and (2) a completed Volunteer Application. Step-by-step instructions on how to register as a volunteer and print out your completed Volunteer Application can be found by clicking HERE.

For more information regarding prerequisites, please click HERE. Should you have any questions regarding the training schedule, please contact our Region Referee Administrator at refereeadmin@lvsoccer.org.
When and where are theIntermediate Referee Trainings?
Intermediate Referee training is mandatory for all intermediate referees. Training assists referees in making practical application of the principles learned online or in the classroom. Region 1258 is hosting the following training sessions for Intermediate Referees:





INTERMEDIATE REFEREE TRAINING
SessionDescriptionDateTimeLocation
1FieldTBDTBDTBD


Please bring the following items to the training session: (1) your Driver's License No. and (2) a completed Volunteer Application. Step-by-step instructions on how to register as a volunteer and print out your completed Volunteer Application can be found by clicking HERE.

For more information regarding prerequisites, please click HERE. Should you have any questions regarding the training schedule, please contact our Region Referee Administrator at refereeadmin@lvsoccer.org.
Law 11 Offside:
This Law is designed to penalize a player who “cheats” by sneaking closer to his/her opponent’s goal than the second-to-last defender (goalkeeper included). If the player has the ball or if the ball is being played directly from a Goal Kick, Corner Kick or Throw-in, the Law is not broken.

To be penalized for being “offside” a player must: (1) be in his opponent’s half of the field ahead of the ball and ahead of the second-to-last defender (goalkeeper included). (2) These conditions must be true at the instant the ball is played forward by a teammate, NOT while it is in flight or received and (3) the player must, in the Referee’s opinion, “participate” in the play.

What constitutes “participation”? That is a secret only Referees and magicians know, but it does involve interfering with play or an opponent, or gaining an advantage. The bottom line is that the only person who can really tell if a player commits an offside infraction is the Referee or Assistant Referee, not the Coach, Players, Parents or Spectators.

Law 5 The Referee:
The Referee is the man or woman who runs, runs, and runs, never scores and The Referee never gets a round of applause. You can play without an attacker, without a defender or even without a goalkeeper, but you cannot play without a Referee.

The Referee’s authority and the exercise of the powers granted him by the Laws of the Game commence as soon as the Referee enters the field of play or its vicinity and continue during and after the match.

The Referee shall enforce the Laws of the game and shall penalize infractions in accordance with those Laws. His decision on points of fact connected with the play shall be final. In other words yelling at or complaining about the Referee’s calls helps a team as much as complaining about the Coach, the condition of the field or the weather.

The language in which the Laws, Rules and Regulations are written is not precise. It is not an engineering specification or a blue print. Therefore, inference is risky since similar wording doesn’t always warrant similar conclusion. Referees call what they see and see what they call. There are always different interpretations due to one’s perception, interest and state of mind. But, again, ultimately is the opinion of the Referee that counts.
Law 6 Assistant Referee (A/R):
The Assistant RefereeTwo Assistant Referees shall assist the Referee (center). They are Certified Assistant Referees or “full” Certified Referees. They assist the Referee (center) by indicating (1) when the ball is out of play because it went out of the touch line or the goal line, (2) which side in entitle to a throw-in, goal kick or corner kick, (3) when a player may be penalized for an offside infraction and (4) when a foul or misconduct has occurred out of view of the Referee.

Caution: the Assistant Referee “assists” the Referee who still is the one to make the final decision. So, the Referee may decide not to follow the Assistant Referee’s signals, but let the play continue for a variety of reasons, except if the ball went out of the touch line or the goal line.

One good example could be the Assistant Referee raising the flag indicating an offside infraction has occurred, but before the referee can blow his whistle to stop play, the ball changes hands (is recovered by the defense). In this instance the Referee lets the play continue (“play-on”). It would be unfair to stop play when the team against which the infraction was committed has the chance for a counter-attack.

In AYSO, when Certified Assistant Referees are not available we use Spectators (generally Parents) to help the Referee. They are called “club linesmen” and can ONLY indicate to the Referee when the ball goes out of the touch line. NO OTHER CALLS CAN BE MADE BY A CLUB LINESMAN.
Law 9 Ball In and Out of Play:
The ball is “out-of-play” when: (1) it has wholly, absolutely, totally and completely crossed the outside edge of the touch line or goal line, whether it is on the ground or in the air, and (2) play has been stopped by the Referee. The ball is “in play” at all other times.

In or Out???
Law 13 Free Kicks:
Free Kick!!!
There are two types of free kicks: direct (from which a goal can be scored directly) and indirect (from which a goal cannot be scored unless the ball has been touched by another player before going into the goal). Which type of kick is awarded depends on Law 12 (we will talk about it shortly).
The Referee will indicate an indirect free kick by raising an arm above his head.

Generally, free kicks take place at the point of the foul or misconduct, one exception being a free kick awarded for a defender committing a MAJOR foul in his/her Penalty Area. In this instance a penalty kick is awarded to the attacking team.

On all free kicks, opponents of the kicker shall remain at least 10 yards from the ball until the kick is taken (or outside the Penalty Area for free kicks taken by the defense).

Free kicks (direct or indirect) awarded to the defending team within their own goal area can be taken from anywhere within the goal area. Any free kick taken by the defense within their own Penalty Area must clear their own Penalty Area before the ball is in play.

On all free kicks, the kicker may not play the ball again until it has been touched by another player.
Law 12 Fouls and Misconduct (Major Fouls):
Since soccer is a game for ladies and gentlemen, strict rules exist for the method of play and personal conduct. Simply stated, play must be fair, safe and fun.

There are 10 “major” fouls which result in a direct free kick awarded to the team which was fouled. Major fouls are divided into two groups. The first group of major fouls includes the following:
Foul!!!
  1. kicking or attempting to kick,
  2. tripping or attempting to trip;
  3. striking or attempting to strike;
  4. charging an opponent;
  5. jumping at an opponent;
  6. pushing and
  7. tackling.
These fouls are all actions committed, in the opinion of the Referee, “carelessly, recklessly, or with excessive force.”

The second group of major fouls includes the following:
  1. deliberately handling the ball (except for the goalkeeper within his/her penalty area);
  2. spitting at an opponent and
  3. holding an opponent.
The fouls in the second group ONLY have to occur.

If any of these 10 major fouls are committed by a defender (including the goalkeeper with the exception of deliberately handling the ball within his/her own Penalty Area), the free kick shall be a Penalty kick.
Law 12 Fouls and Misconduct (Minor Fouls):
There are 8 “minor” fouls which result in an indirect free kick awarded to the team which was fouled. Minor fouls include the following:
  1. dangerous play;
  2. impeding an opponent’s progress while not within playing distance of the ball (obstruction);
  3. preventing the goalkeeper from releasing the ball into play (punting);
  4. goalkeeper in possession of the ball taking more than 6 seconds to put it into play;
  5. goal keeper taking “double” possession which means releasing the ball and then touching it again with his hands (if the goalkeeper puts the ball on the ground to kick it instead of punting it, the ball becomes a fair ball for anyone to kick and if the goalkeeper touches the ball again with his/her hands he/she commits a foul of “double touch”);
  6. goalkeeper touching the ball with his/her hands after it has been deliberately kicked to him/her by a teammate (pass back);
  7. goalkeeper touching the balls with his/her hands after receiving it directly from a throw-in taken by a teammate; and
  8. any other offense not mentioned in the Law 12 (i.e., play was stopped to administer a caution or a send-off).
All fouls must be committed by a player against an opponent or the opposing team, within the field of play and while the ball is in play. If any one of these three conditions is missing there is no foul.

“High kicking” and “playing the ball while lying on the ground” are not necessarily fouls even if they occur close to your son or daughter. They are fouls ONLY when perceived to be a “dangerous play” by the Referee.

PLEASE NOTE: Children from 5 years of age to 10 and, at times, even 12 are still fighting to gain control of their movements. Their coordination may still be in the developmental stage. Therefore, hand ball, pushing, dangerous play, tripping fouls are quite common. The referee should remember Law 18 (common sense) when officiating that age group of children.
Law 12 Fouls and Misconduct (Misconduct):
There are 7 types of misconduct for which a player shall be “cautioned” (shown a yellow card). Cautionable misconduct includes:
  1. dissent by word or action;Cards
  2. unsporting behavior (formerly ungentlemanly conduct);
  3. persistent infringement of the Laws by a player or team;
  4. failure to respect the mandatory distance on free kicks, corner kicks or throw-ins;
  5. delaying a re-start;
  6. entering or re-entering the field of play without the Referee’s permission, and
  7. leaving the field of play without the Referee’s permission (coaches take notice).
There are 7 types of misconduct for which a player shall be “sent-off” (shown the red card). Ejectionable misconduct includes:
  1. serious foul play;
  2. violent conduct;
  3. preventing a goal or goal scoring opportunity by handling the ball;
  4. preventing a goal or a goal scoring opportunity by committing a direct free kick foul (major foul);
  5. spitting at an opponent or any other person;
  6. using insulting, offensive, abusive language or gestures; and
  7. receiving a second caution (yellow card).
If the referee stops play to deal with misconduct and NO foul has occurred, play shall re-start with an indirect free kick.

Misconduct applies not only to players, but also to substitutes, coaches and spectators. Coaches and Spectators may be warned or expelled (do not use send-off) for “irresponsible behavior” from the field of play and its vicinity although they are not shown the yellow or red card. What is “irresponsible behavior”? Anything that, in the opinion of the Referee, causes disruption, puts the safety of the players in jeopardy or is deemed unsportsmanlike (i.e., against basic coaching behavior: Positive; Instructional; Encouraging).

A WORD OF CAUTION: do not show cards to young players, U-12 included. The showing of cards is humiliating and embarrassing to the children. My personal experience has been that well chosen words from the Referee have kept young players on the right path and certainly kept the game flowing and in good spirit. What I am suggesting to all of us Referees is to reach deep in our hearts where we will find the answer to the real and troubling question: “why do I believe I have to raise my arm holding that card to announce to the entire world that this young player was guilty of improper behavior?” Cards do not talk and referees do not have to be mute. Then I say, why not make it a contest with ourselves and officiate in such a way as to be able to finish the game with all players on the Pitch, all four Coaches on the side lines and the yellow and red cards left buried at the bottom of our bags.
Law 12 Fouls and Misconduct (The Tackle):
My great concern about what I have seen some Referees allow and some Coaches teach has compelled me to write more on a specific direct free kick foul. The tackle is the most dangerous and risky play in soccer. It is my humble opinion and belief that the tackle is 99.9% foul and should not be overlooked.

Before the elevation of the “tackle” to the first group of direct free kick fouls , FIFA Law 12 defined it as “an action against an opponent to gain possession of the ball making contact with the opponent before touching the ball.” Unfortunately this definition gave rise to the misconception that as long as the player got the ball first the subsequent action would be irrelevant. SUCH A BELIEF WAS TOTALLY ARBITRARY.

In fact, “the Advise to Referees on the Laws of the game” for Law 12.7 clearly states, “the fact that contact with the ball was made first does not automatically mean that the tackle was fair and further the declaration of the player that he/she has played the ball is IRRELEVANT if while tackling for the ball, the player carelessly, recklessly or with excessive force commits any of the prohibited actions”. Let us make it abundantly clear to the Players, Parents, Coaches and Referees that whether the player makes contact with the ball first is totally irrelevant if, in the opinion of the Referee, the action was unfair and committed in the manner already described.

What does “carelessly, recklessly, or with excessive force” really mean? Simply stated:
  1. Careless – the player has not exercised due caution in making a play.
  2. Reckless – the player has made unnatural movements designed to intimidate an opponent or to gain an unfair advantage.
  3. Excessive Force – the player has far exceeded the use of force necessary to make a fair play for the ball and has placed the opponent in considerable danger of bodily harm.
If the foul was careless, simply a miscalculation of strength or a stretch of judgment by the player who committed it, then it is a normal foul, requiring only a direct free kick and possibly a stern talking-to. If the foul was reckless, clearly outside the norm for fair play then the Referee must award to the team against which the foul was committed, a direct free kick and he must also CAUTION the offending player for “unsporting behavior” by showing the yellow card. However, if the foul involved the use of excessive force, totally beyond the bounds of normal play, then the Referee must SEND-OFF the player for serious foul play or violent conduct, show the red card and award a direct free kick to the opposing team.
Law 12 Fouls and Misconduct (Sliding Tackle):
“Sliding tackle” is a term indicating an attempt by a player to dispossess the opponent of the ball by sliding and kicking or pinning the ball.” There is no place in the FIFA Laws of The Game or in “the advise to referees on the Laws“ differentiating a “sliding tackle” from any other type of tackle. Whether a player attempts a tackle from behind, front, side or by sliding is still a TACKLE, the most dangerous play in Soccer. If a player wants to slide all over the pitch to get to the ball, fine, there is no foul as long as, in the opinion of the Referee, it is fair and safe to do so.

Law 14 Penalty Kicks:
When a “major foul,” which results in a direct free kick, is committed in the Penalty Area of the offending team, a Penalty Kick is awarded to the team against which the foul was committed. All players, except the designated kicker and defending goal keeper, shall remain outside the penalty area and the penalty arc (10 yards from the penalty mark) and behind the ball until it is kicked. The kick shall be taken from the penalty mark, the ball must move forward and the goal keeper may move laterally but must remain on the goal line until the ball is kicked. The kicker cannot touch the ball again until it has been touched by another player (i.e., the ball rebounds from the goalkeeper).

The Laws governing the outcome of a penalty kick are really complicated and depend on who moved and whether the ball went into the goal:
  1. If the defense (goalkeeper included) encroached into the penalty area and the ball went in, the goal is good, but if the ball did not go in, the kick is retaken.
  2. If the attackers encroached and the ball went in, the kick is retaken, but if the ball did not go in, a goal kick is awarded.
  3. If both teams encroached, the kick is retaken regardless of where the ball went.
Now, Ladies and Gentlemen you can see why it is easier to let the Referee decide the result of a penalty kick. Even if we know the rules, the Referee’s opinion is the only one that counts anyway.

Though not a part of Law 14, kicks from the penalty mark come into play when the teams remain in a tie situation after the regular time and the two overtime periods expire. If the Rules of Competition call for a winner to be decided, it is done by taking kicks from the penalty mark. Five players from each team take the kicks. The team that scores more goals is declared the winner. If after all five kicks have been taken by each team and they are still in a tie situation, then additional players from each team, one at a time, take the kicks till one scores and the other does not. How far is the penalty mark from the Goal line? Pretty close: only 12 yards.
Law 8 The Start of Play:
The team winning the coin toss shall choose a goal to attack. The other team shall take the kick–off from the center of the field upon the signal from the Referee. All players shall remain in their own half of the field, and the “receiving” team players shall remain outside the center circle untill the ball is kicked.

The ball must be kicked forward into the opponent’s half of the field and shall not be played a second time by the initial kicker. If an opponent of the kicker enters the center circle before the kick is taken and the Referee blows the whistle, the kick shall be retaken.
Law 7 Duration of the Game:
Game duration shall be as follows:
  • U-19 shall have two 45 minute halves;
  • U-16 shall have two 40 minutes halves;
  • U-14 shall have two 35 minutes halves;
  • U-12 shall have two 30 minute halves;
  • U-10 shall have two 25 minute halves; and
  • U-8 shall have two 20 minute halves.
The Referee is the official time keeper (not the Coach, a Parent and not even the Assistant Referee). The Referee shall add time at his/her discretion for substitutions, injuries, time wasting, or any other disruption of the game (animals, earthquakes, irate parents, etc). The Referee may terminate a game for a variety of reasons (safety, field conditions, weather conditions), but cannot declare a winner regardless of the score or time remaining.
Law 10 Method of Scoring:
A goal shall be awarded when the ball passes completely over the goal line between the uprights and under the cross-bar, unless it was propelled, thrown, or carried by the hand or arm of an attacking player. An “own goal” played by a defender into his/her own net counts as a goal for the attacking team. A goal shall not be awarded directly from a throw-in or an indirect free kick.
Law 16 Goal Kick:
When the ball passes over the goal line without going into the goal, having last been touched by a defender, a corner kick shall be awarded to the attacking team. The corner kick shall be taken from within the corner area outlined by a quarter circle near where it crossed the goal line. The player taking the kick shall not move the corner flag and all the players on the defending team must remain at least 10 yards from the ball until is kicked. A goal may be scored directly from a corner kick. The ball is in play when is kicked and moves. It does not have to come out of the quarter circle before being in play.
Law 17 Corner Kick:
When the ball passes over the goal line without going into the goal, having last been touched by a defender, a corner kick shall be awarded to the attacking team. The corner kick shall be taken from within the corner area outlined by a quarter circle near where it crossed the goal line. The player taking the kick shall not move the corner flag and all the players on the defending team must remain at least 10 yards from the ball until is kicked. A goal may be scored directly from a corner kick. The ball is in play when is kicked and moves. It does not have to come out of the quarter circle before being in play.
Law 4 Players Equipment:
The players must wear clothes. They must not wear anything that may be construed by the Referee as posing a danger to themselves or other players. They must wear shin guards, which must be fully covered by the socks and their shirts must remain tucked in. Casts and splints (even if padded) are prohibited, as are watches, ear rings, nose rings, lip rings or any other exposed ring. NO EXCEPTIONS.
Law 3 The Players:

Two teams of no more than eleven players or no less than seven players each shall constitute a Match. AYSO team composition and substitution rules vary with the age of the players, the phase of the moon and the price of pasta. The Referee will explain the substitution rules to each Coach prior to the Match.

Substitutions are made ONLY DURING A STOPPAGE IN PLAY.

In AYSO substitutions are made (1) any time between the first and second quarter; (2) at the starting of the second half; (3) any time between the third and the forth quarter; and (4) for injury.

When should the referee stop play for an injury? The Law states: at any time. We recommend that Referees use their best judgment depending on the age of the players and what appears to be the nature of the injury.

Law 2 The Ball:
The ball shall be round and not pointy. Bigger balls are used by bigger players and vice versa. The ball should be inflated to 800-1100 gr/cm2. What this means in real life is that the ball shall be inflated “hard enough to hurt if someone kicks it into your face.” Additional balls may be placed around the field of play for use during a Match provided that they meet the requirements of Law 2 and their use is under the control of the Referee.

Balls”>
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Law 1 The Field of Play:
The field (aka the Pitch) of play shall be rectangular and no less than 50 by 100 yards and no more than 80 by 130 yards. The size of AYSO fields will vary depending on the age of the players. The field should have the following features:
  • Goals and marked goal areas in front of the goal;
  • Penalty areas (not “boxes”) in front of the goal areas;
  • Corner areas (quarter circles for the taking of corner kicks);
  • A halfway (midfield) line;
  • A 10-yard radius center-circle;
  • A half circle at the top of the penalty area and behind the penalty mark (which is used to keep all players 10 yards from the penalty mark); and
  • A penalty mark 12 yards from the goal line and in the center of the goal itself.
The goals should be 8 yards wide by 8 feet high (smaller for younger divisions) and should have nets to help the referee know when a goal is scored. Field markings may include a Coaches’ area parallel to and one yard from the touch line (side line) and extending 10 yards either side of the halfway line. Corner flags should be placed at each corner of the field and must be at least 5 feet high. A proper field is depicted in the diagram below:

Field of Play” />
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